A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
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When we contrast the two bodies, we see that the House is slightly more conservative at 0.27 than the Senate is liberal at -0.20. That fits with the idea that polarization is “asymmetric,” with House Republicans more responsible than Senate Democrats, but it’s clear that the median member of both chambers is closer to the poles than they usually are. The median House member in the current Congress is the fourth-most conservative out of 49 Congresses since the end of World War I. The median senator is tied for the fourth-most liberal.

When we contrast the two bodies, we see that the House is slightly more conservative at 0.27 than the Senate is liberal at -0.20. That fits with the idea that polarization is “asymmetric,” with House Republicans more responsible than Senate Democrats, but it’s clear that the median member of both chambers is closer to the poles than they usually are. The median House member in the current Congress is the fourth-most conservative out of 49 Congresses since the end of World War I. The median senator is tied for the fourth-most liberal.

policymic:

According to FiveThirtyEight, the GOP has a 60% chance of taking the Senate this year

Nate Silver’s much-anticipated FiveThirtyEight site just launched this month and there’s been a lot of speculation regarding what political predictions the statistics wonk will come up with next. Well, the site already has it first big forecast, and it may be a surprise to some: while Silver originally wrote that the 2014’s 36 Senate races would be a toss-up, he now believes that the Republicans are the “slight favorites” to win the Senate chamber.
According to FiveThirtyEight, the Republicans have a clear edge in Senate races in West Virginia, South Dakota, Montana and Arkansas. If the GOP maintains its seats in Georgia and Kentucky and wins the toss-ups in Alaska, North Carolina or Michigan, it has a 60% chance of turning the Congress fully red.

Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

According to FiveThirtyEight, the GOP has a 60% chance of taking the Senate this year

Nate Silver’s much-anticipated FiveThirtyEight site just launched this month and there’s been a lot of speculation regarding what political predictions the statistics wonk will come up with next. Well, the site already has it first big forecast, and it may be a surprise to some: while Silver originally wrote that the 2014’s 36 Senate races would be a toss-up, he now believes that the Republicans are the “slight favorites” to win the Senate chamber.

According to FiveThirtyEight, the Republicans have a clear edge in Senate races in West Virginia, South Dakota, Montana and Arkansas. If the GOP maintains its seats in Georgia and Kentucky and wins the toss-ups in Alaska, North Carolina or Michigan, it has a 60% chance of turning the Congress fully red.

Read moreFollow policymic

Democrats have landed about as strong a candidate as they could have hoped for in the Mississippi Senate race, in which Republicans are heavily favored.
Former Democratic Rep. Travis Childers, who represented the state’s deeply conservative 1st congressional district from May 2008 to January 2011, jumped in the race on Friday.

Democrats have landed about as strong a candidate as they could have hoped for in the Mississippi Senate race, in which Republicans are heavily favored.

Former Democratic Rep. Travis Childers, who represented the state’s deeply conservative 1st congressional district from May 2008 to January 2011, jumped in the race on Friday.

Scott Brown moves closer to Senate run in N.H.

Conservatives’ illogical, inconsistent effort to repeal the 17th Amendment

State legislatures used to elect our Senators. The 17th Amendment let citizens elect them directly. Now conservatives want to go back. Here’s why that’s a bad idea.

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Coal is no longer viable as a long term source of energy, or a reliable source of jobs in Montana.
Democratic Sen. Landrieu Walks A Fine Line In Red Louisiana

If Democrats are going to keep their majority in the Senate, they’ll need to hang on to a few critical seats they hold in conservative states.

Mary Landrieu of Louisiana has one of those, and like some of her colleagues up for re-election, her support of the Affordable Care Act could be the mountain to overcome this fall.

Democratic Sen. Landrieu Walks A Fine Line In Red Louisiana

If Democrats are going to keep their majority in the Senate, they’ll need to hang on to a few critical seats they hold in conservative states.

Mary Landrieu of Louisiana has one of those, and like some of her colleagues up for re-election, her support of the Affordable Care Act could be the mountain to overcome this fall.

Gillibrand wants vote on military sex assault bill ‘right away’

But a vote likely won’t come until some point in 2014.

If passed, the bill will end the statute of limitations on assault and rape allegations; require the dishonorable discharge or dismissal of anyone convicted of sexual assault; and stop military commanders from reversing decisions made by military prosecutors.


The U.S. Senate confirmed two nominees today, one (Patricia Millett) for the D.C. Circuit court and one (Mel Watt) for a housing policy job in the administration.* These nominations had been “controversial” for months. They went through with no fanfare at all; the political world seemed more distracted by the question of whether President Obama was wrong to take a selfie at Nelson Mandela’s memorial event.

The U.S. Senate confirmed two nominees today, one (Patricia Millett) for the D.C. Circuit court and one (Mel Watt) for a housing policy job in the administration.* These nominations had been “controversial” for months. They went through with no fanfare at all; the political world seemed more distracted by the question of whether President Obama was wrong to take a selfie at Nelson Mandela’s memorial event.

The dissolution of bipartisanship in American politics, visualized

The dissolution of bipartisanship in American politics, visualized