A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

micdotcom:

47% of white people think race is getting more attention that it deserves in Ferguson


It’s one thing to disagree about the circumstances of the shooting death of Mike Brown, but it’s another entirely to pretend that the case truly lacks racial implications . Despite sustained protests and arrest statistics that prove Ferguson’s police department disproportionately targeted the town’s black community, four out of 10 whites don’t think that the resulting conversation about race and policing deserves as much attention as it’s gotten.
And it gets worse

micdotcom:

47% of white people think race is getting more attention that it deserves in Ferguson

It’s one thing to disagree about the circumstances of the shooting death of Mike Brown, but it’s another entirely to pretend that the case truly lacks racial implications . Despite sustained protests and arrest statistics that prove Ferguson’s police department disproportionately targeted the town’s black community, four out of 10 whites don’t think that the resulting conversation about race and policing deserves as much attention as it’s gotten.

And it gets worse

29 Tumblr Posts About White People That Will Make You Sip Your Tea

If we white people can’t laugh about ourselves, how in the hell can we laugh about anybody else?
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   

Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.

Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.

Read more | Follow micdotcom 

cornflakepizza:

iraniandiaspora:

newwavenova:

stupiduglyfatcunt:

fatbisexualpenguin:

People who say bi erasure doesn’t happen need to realize Freddie Mercury is known as the most famous homosexual man when he identified himself as bisexual. If that’s not bi erasure I don’t even know.

Also PoC erasure, most people don’t know he was 100% Indian

Specifically he was Parsi.
Also raised Zeroastrian.

*zoroastrian 

(Source: spoopybisexualpenguin, via sepiaspookus)

Black Parents, Gay Sons and Redefining Masculinity

Orange Is the New Black's Latina characters are women we hardly ever see on television

thelonelyscarecrow:

castiels-time-traveler:

nintendocanada:

mapsontheweb:

Map of the World by Natural Skin Color

i’m really dumbfounded that i never realized skin colour is literally just caused by being closer to or farther from the equator and the resulting sun exposure and skin darkening

actually, its an adaptation. natural selection. people with darker skin are selected for in areas near the equator, where the melanin that causes the darker color protects them from radiation and protects them from skin cancer and other health defects, and because they are healthier they can pass on that trait more. people near the poles have lighter skin because it allows them absorb more of the limited sunlight to convert to vitamin d. 

THIS IS THE THING SOME PEOPLE HATE OTHER PEOPLE OVER.Evolution of melanin levels based on geographical location.

thelonelyscarecrow:

castiels-time-traveler:

nintendocanada:

mapsontheweb:

Map of the World by Natural Skin Color

i’m really dumbfounded that i never realized skin colour is literally just caused by being closer to or farther from the equator and the resulting sun exposure and skin darkening

actually, its an adaptation. natural selection. people with darker skin are selected for in areas near the equator, where the melanin that causes the darker color protects them from radiation and protects them from skin cancer and other health defects, and because they are healthier they can pass on that trait more. people near the poles have lighter skin because it allows them absorb more of the limited sunlight to convert to vitamin d. 

THIS IS THE THING SOME PEOPLE HATE OTHER PEOPLE OVER.

Evolution of melanin levels based on geographical location.

(via greeklesbian)

policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”
2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”
3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”
4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”
5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”
6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”
Answers 
policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”
2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”
3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”
4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”
5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”
6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”
Answers 
policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”
2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”
3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”
4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”
5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”
6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”
Answers 

policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”

2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”

3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”

4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”

5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”

6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”

Answers 

amu-baqi:

snarkbender:

kropotkitten:

Fun History Fact: The overwhelming majority of cowboys in the U.S. were Indigenous, Black, and/or Mexican persons. The omnipresent white cowboy is a Hollywood studio concoction meant to uphold the mythology of white masculinity.

white people, this is why nobody trusts you

THANK YOU

(Source: scaredykropotkitten, via sepiaspookus)

doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.
doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.

doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.

(via greeklesbian)

policymic:

54% of Asian-American teens have been bulled

More than half of all Asian American students are bullied in school, according to a joint study by the U.S. Justice and Education departments. That statistic was much higher than what they found for other groups. (For the purpose of the study, “Asian American” included students of East Asian, South Asian and South Pacific heritage.)
Read more
policymic:

54% of Asian-American teens have been bulled

More than half of all Asian American students are bullied in school, according to a joint study by the U.S. Justice and Education departments. That statistic was much higher than what they found for other groups. (For the purpose of the study, “Asian American” included students of East Asian, South Asian and South Pacific heritage.)
Read more

policymic:

54% of Asian-American teens have been bulled

More than half of all Asian American students are bullied in school, according to a joint study by the U.S. Justice and Education departments. That statistic was much higher than what they found for other groups. (For the purpose of the study, “Asian American” included students of East Asian, South Asian and South Pacific heritage.)

Read more