A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   
Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.
Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

9 ways ‘Orange Is the New Black’ shatters race and gender stereotypes

The buzz about season 2 of Orange Is the New Black has already hit a fever pitch. The female-powered cast, many of whom are relatively new faces on American television, creates a rich mosaic of diversity and represents a wide spectrum of gender, racial identity and sexuality.   

Some critics panned the first season and the moments when female characters of color in the prison performed or reinforced stereotypes. But as the season developed, we learned that some characters appear to be stereotypes at first because they are introduced to us from Piper’s perspective when she first arrives to Litchfield. Our preconceived notions of who these women are and why they are in prison gets shattered as the series progresses.

Over the course of Season 2, Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan and her team of writers continue to peel away the layers and reveal a multicultural cast that is as hilarious as they are complicated. And when it comes to those dreaded stereotypes, the writers are much more explicit in their nudges to the audience that they, too, are in on the joke.

Read more | Follow micdotcom 

cornflakepizza:

iraniandiaspora:

newwavenova:

stupiduglyfatcunt:

fatbisexualpenguin:

People who say bi erasure doesn’t happen need to realize Freddie Mercury is known as the most famous homosexual man when he identified himself as bisexual. If that’s not bi erasure I don’t even know.

Also PoC erasure, most people don’t know he was 100% Indian

Specifically he was Parsi.
Also raised Zeroastrian.

*zoroastrian 

(via sepiacircus)

Black Parents, Gay Sons and Redefining Masculinity

Orange Is the New Black's Latina characters are women we hardly ever see on television

thelonelyscarecrow:

castiels-time-traveler:

nintendocanada:

mapsontheweb:

Map of the World by Natural Skin Color

i’m really dumbfounded that i never realized skin colour is literally just caused by being closer to or farther from the equator and the resulting sun exposure and skin darkening

actually, its an adaptation. natural selection. people with darker skin are selected for in areas near the equator, where the melanin that causes the darker color protects them from radiation and protects them from skin cancer and other health defects, and because they are healthier they can pass on that trait more. people near the poles have lighter skin because it allows them absorb more of the limited sunlight to convert to vitamin d. 

THIS IS THE THING SOME PEOPLE HATE OTHER PEOPLE OVER.Evolution of melanin levels based on geographical location.

thelonelyscarecrow:

castiels-time-traveler:

nintendocanada:

mapsontheweb:

Map of the World by Natural Skin Color

i’m really dumbfounded that i never realized skin colour is literally just caused by being closer to or farther from the equator and the resulting sun exposure and skin darkening

actually, its an adaptation. natural selection. people with darker skin are selected for in areas near the equator, where the melanin that causes the darker color protects them from radiation and protects them from skin cancer and other health defects, and because they are healthier they can pass on that trait more. people near the poles have lighter skin because it allows them absorb more of the limited sunlight to convert to vitamin d. 

THIS IS THE THING SOME PEOPLE HATE OTHER PEOPLE OVER.

Evolution of melanin levels based on geographical location.

(via greeklesbian)

policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”
2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”
3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”
4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”
5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”
6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”
Answers 
policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”
2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”
3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”
4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”
5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”
6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”
Answers 
policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”
2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”
3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”
4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”
5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”
6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”
Answers 

policymic:

Who said it: Cliven Bundy or the Almost Politically Correct Redneck meme?

1. “Not against gay marriage … unless the couple is colored.”

2. “[Spanish people] … come over here against our Constitution and cross our borders … [but] don’t tell me they don’t have better family structures than most of us white people.”

3. “If I say ‘negro’ or ‘black boy’ or ‘slave’ … if those people cannot take those kind of words and not be [offended] then Martin Luther King hasn’t got his job done yet.”

4. “There should be no wage discrimination, no matter if you are working in an office, a factory … or [doing] a woman’s work.”

5. “It [doesn’t] matter to me if [you’re] yellow, brown, black, orange, or normal.”

6. “Not all Muslims are terrorists … one of [them’s] our president.”

Answers 

amu-baqi:

snarkbender:

kropotkitten:

Fun History Fact: The overwhelming majority of cowboys in the U.S. were Indigenous, Black, and/or Mexican persons. The omnipresent white cowboy is a Hollywood studio concoction meant to uphold the mythology of white masculinity.

white people, this is why nobody trusts you

THANK YOU

(via sepiacircus)

doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.
doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.

doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.

(via greeklesbian)

policymic:

54% of Asian-American teens have been bulled

More than half of all Asian American students are bullied in school, according to a joint study by the U.S. Justice and Education departments. That statistic was much higher than what they found for other groups. (For the purpose of the study, “Asian American” included students of East Asian, South Asian and South Pacific heritage.)
Read more
policymic:

54% of Asian-American teens have been bulled

More than half of all Asian American students are bullied in school, according to a joint study by the U.S. Justice and Education departments. That statistic was much higher than what they found for other groups. (For the purpose of the study, “Asian American” included students of East Asian, South Asian and South Pacific heritage.)
Read more

policymic:

54% of Asian-American teens have been bulled

More than half of all Asian American students are bullied in school, according to a joint study by the U.S. Justice and Education departments. That statistic was much higher than what they found for other groups. (For the purpose of the study, “Asian American” included students of East Asian, South Asian and South Pacific heritage.)

Read more

breakingnews:

Obama awards Medals of Honor to 24 minority veterans
CNN: President Barack Obama honored 24 Army veterans with the Medal of Honor today for their combat actions in Vietnam, Korea and World War II.
The White House said the soldiers were passed over for country’s highest military award because of discrimination.
"Some of these soldiers fought and died for a country that did not always see them as equal," Obama said during the ceremony at the White House. "…Their courage almost defies imagination."
Of the 24, only three are alive to receive the recognition and 10 never came home.
Photo: Spc. Santiago J. Erevia received the Medal of Honor on Tuesday. Erevia was a radiotelephone operator in Vietnam. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images)

breakingnews:

Obama awards Medals of Honor to 24 minority veterans

CNNPresident Barack Obama honored 24 Army veterans with the Medal of Honor today for their combat actions in Vietnam, Korea and World War II.

The White House said the soldiers were passed over for country’s highest military award because of discrimination.

"Some of these soldiers fought and died for a country that did not always see them as equal," Obama said during the ceremony at the White House. "…Their courage almost defies imagination."

Of the 24, only three are alive to receive the recognition and 10 never came home.

Photo: Spc. Santiago J. Erevia received the Medal of Honor on Tuesday. Erevia was a radiotelephone operator in Vietnam. (Joe Raedle / Getty Images)

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prisonMarch 14, 2014
Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 
But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.
“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”
Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)
Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.
“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.
“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”
As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.
Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.
Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prison
March 14, 2014

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.

Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.

Full article

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via marbleflakes)