A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

policymic:

College rankings are broken: Don’t pick a school based on how much you’ll make after graduation


The numbers of students saying work-related reasons were a major motivator in going to college is at an all-time high. In fact, 87.9% of students say they’re going to college for a better job, 74.6% say they’re doing so to make more money and 81% of students say it’s to be well-off financially.
So what are these ratings measuring and does it match up to what students want?
The ROI rankings compare a university’s tuition to how much graduates make in the few years after college. They don’t consider the quality of education or what students are studying or even what young people today really care about. In other words, this ranking system is outdated.
ROI rankings compare how much it costs to attend a school with the average earnings of graduates. But, it’s an average of all graduates. Rick Fry, an economist at the Pew Research Center, told PolicyMic it depends more on what you studied than where you actually went to school. “Major field of study has a greater bearing on payoff than the particular college one attends,” he said.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

College rankings are broken: Don’t pick a school based on how much you’ll make after graduation

The numbers of students saying work-related reasons were a major motivator in going to college is at an all-time high. In fact, 87.9% of students say they’re going to college for a better job, 74.6% say they’re doing so to make more money and 81% of students say it’s to be well-off financially.

So what are these ratings measuring and does it match up to what students want?

The ROI rankings compare a university’s tuition to how much graduates make in the few years after college. They don’t consider the quality of education or what students are studying or even what young people today really care about. In other words, this ranking system is outdated.

ROI rankings compare how much it costs to attend a school with the average earnings of graduates. But, it’s an average of all graduates. Rick Fry, an economist at the Pew Research Center, told PolicyMic it depends more on what you studied than where you actually went to school. “Major field of study has a greater bearing on payoff than the particular college one attends,” he said.

Read moreFollow policymic

The 10 Biggest Myths In Economics

1) The government “prints money”.  

2)  Banks “lend reserves”.  

3)  The US government is running out of money and must pay back the national debt.

4)  The national debt is a burden that will ruin our children’s futures.  

5)  QE is inflationary “money printing” and/or “debt monetization”.  

6)  Hyperinflation is caused by “money printing”.  

7)  Government spending drives up interest rates and bond vigilantes control interest rates.  

8)  The Fed was created by a secret cabal of bankers to wreck the US economy.

9)  Fallacy of composition.  

10)  Economics is a science.  

theatlantic:

There’s No Way to Follow the Money

Christmas comes early for campaign watchdogs—or late, depending on your perspective. Thanks to a lag in IRS reporting rules, the tax returns of independent groups that spent hundreds of millions of dollars in the 2012 election are just now coming due. Considered together with a recent campaign-finance investigation in California, these filings hint at an orgy of self-dealing and “dark money” shenanigans unprecedented in American politics.
The first presidential election since the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision spawned what Bloomberg Businessweek called “a Cayman Islands-style web of nonprofit front groups and shell companies.” These not only shielded donors’ identities but also obscured the huge profits of political operatives who moved nimbly between the candidates, the super PACs, and the vendors that get their business.
Read more. [Image: Gary Cameron/Reuters]

theatlantic:

There’s No Way to Follow the Money

Christmas comes early for campaign watchdogs—or late, depending on your perspective. Thanks to a lag in IRS reporting rules, the tax returns of independent groups that spent hundreds of millions of dollars in the 2012 election are just now coming due. Considered together with a recent campaign-finance investigation in California, these filings hint at an orgy of self-dealing and “dark money” shenanigans unprecedented in American politics.

The first presidential election since the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision spawned what Bloomberg Businessweek called “a Cayman Islands-style web of nonprofit front groups and shell companies.” These not only shielded donors’ identities but also obscured the huge profits of political operatives who moved nimbly between the candidates, the super PACs, and the vendors that get their business.

Read more. [Image: Gary Cameron/Reuters]

mintparades:

sure, money can’t buy you “happiness” but it can buy you a sense of financial security, remove the worry of not being able to feed yourself, remove the fear of losing your house, remove the discomfort of not being able to socialize because you don’t have the money to go out, and also it can buy you the new pokemon game and that’s pretty fucking close

(Source: murdererbyproxy, via sepiacircus)

What Happens When You Just Give Money To Poor People?

teamsternation:

Actually, things have gotten worse since 2010. The 40% of Americans no longer even own the red dot.
teamsternation:

Actually, things have gotten worse since 2010. The 40% of Americans no longer even own the red dot.

teamsternation:

Actually, things have gotten worse since 2010. The 40% of Americans no longer even own the red dot.

(via marbleflakes)

theatlanticcities:

"If you have a fatalistic view of life, the answer will utterly not surprise you. The planet’s happiest denizens reside in wealthy countries, whereas the least joyful live in impoverished nations. People with mid-range levels of contentment seem to have crowded into Russia, for what it’s worth."
Mapping the Glum Inequality of Happiness in the World
[Graphic via Jonathan Hull]

theatlanticcities:

"If you have a fatalistic view of life, the answer will utterly not surprise you. The planet’s happiest denizens reside in wealthy countries, whereas the least joyful live in impoverished nations. People with mid-range levels of contentment seem to have crowded into Russia, for what it’s worth."

Mapping the Glum Inequality of Happiness in the World

[Graphic via Jonathan Hull]

(via theatlantic)

THE BIG MONEY IN TAX BREAKS: TOP 3 TAX BREAKS IN 2013

THE BIG MONEY IN TAX BREAKS: TOP 3 TAX BREAKS IN 2013

apparently I have to school some people’s asses on being poor again

stfuconservatives:

elfstaranymore:

Listen up, Tumblr. There are some cold hard facts about being poor that you need to know before you try to talk to me or my family or any other poor person about anything involving money, food, jobs, housing or healthcare.

  • Being poor is expensive as fuck. Living paycheck-to-paycheck means you can’t shell out lots of money at once for a reliable car, so you have to buy a used car that might break down more often. Or maybe you can’t pay monthly insurance costs so you end up with a $2000 emergency room bill. Renting costs more in the long run than owning. And so on.
  • Asking for money doesn’t fucking hurt anybody. As long as you ask in a way that is not abusive or coercive, you should not feel ashamed if you sometimes have to ask for money. ESPECIALLY if you do it via crowdsourcing or some other method that doesn’t put pressure on any one person. Don’t you dare shame a poor person for asking for help taking care of themselves or their family.
  • Sometimes poor people have nice things. Yeah, I fucking said it. I have a nice TV and some game consoles that I bought when money was less tight. In fact, anytime a poor person gets an unexpected sum of money, like a birthday gift or a tax return, it often goes to something like that. Know why? Because we know we might never get another chance to buy the thing. And being resourceful people, we also know that if we have a chance to buy a nice thing now it will cost less in the long run than buying a neverending series of things that break after a month. We also get really fucking tired of always looking like poor people to everyone else. It sucks always being the house nobody wants to visit because somebody else can afford an XBOX 360 and you can’t. Finally, you don’t fucking know where that nice thing a poor person has came from. Maybe it was a gift, or somebody gave them a Best Buy gift card and they bought a laptop. Maybe a rich person was giving it away on Craigslist. Maybe the person wasn’t always poor but shit got hard recently. Maybe they actually saved up pennies for a year to buy it. You don’t know, and it’s not actually your business anyway.
  • Healthy food is more expensive than unhealthy food. I’m not going to even argue this point, I’m just going to fucking shout it. HEALTHY FOOD IS MORE EXPENSIVE THAN UNHEALTHY FOOD.
  • It’s none of your business why someone is poor. Maybe they have a disability, maybe unemployment is high in their field, maybe they are part of a group that has been socioeconomically oppressed for generations and you don’t just fucking pull your bootstraps up out of that. I’ve never met anybody who was poor just for the hell of it. But you know what? Some people are poor because they made irresponsible decisions or they’re addicted to drugs or gambling. Those people are still people and they still deserve food and shelter.
  • You can’t always get what you need at a thrift store or garage sale, and if you can, it still costs money. Some people have never actually set foot in a thrift store, so let me tell you what they’re like. There are rows and rows of clothes that are ugly or have holes in them or don’t fit you. And by ugly, I mean ugly-sweater-party ugly, like if I wore that to work I’d get fired ugly. If you’re REALLY lucky you might find ONE OR TWO things that fit and won’t fall apart after one washing. If you’re fat, trans or having other specific clothing needs it’s even worse. These are clothes that people rejected, and most of the time it was for a reason. Then there’s a lot of sketchy appliances from 1973 that somebody cleaned out of their mom’s garage after she died, toys for children 3 and under but fuck you if you have a ten-year-old, etc. They can be surprisingly good places to find books and Disney VHS tapes, but that’s about it.
  • For similar reasons, things like Freecycle are spotty as hell. I live in a major metropolitan area. Currently, the things that are available on my local Freecycle list include an automatic pet water dish, various non-essential baby supplies, a “microwave splatter cover”, and a couple of office chairs. This is pretty representative of what is generally offered. It’s not a great place to get things you specifically need.
  • There is no such thing as the welfare queen. This could be an entire post by itself, but let me give you a quick run-down of what ‘welfare’ usually consists of. This varies by state, but the aid available in Massachusetts includes food stamps ($200 a month max, doesn’t buy things like toilet paper, diapers or pet food), Emergency Aid for Elders, Disabled and Children ($300/month max if you qualify, you obviously have to be elderly, disabled or have children, and have to have almost nothing in your bank account), MassHealth insurance (actually pretty good but the application process can be long, and the state penalizes you by withholding some of your tax return if you go too long without insurance), and Section 8 housing vouchers, for which there is a waiting list of a year or more. If you manage to qualify for EVERYTHING, and you don’t have any kids, you might manage to scrape together enough to live off of. But barely. And MA is one of the better states for stuff like this.

There is probably a lot more shit I could tell you about what it’s like to be poor, but I’m tired and achy and so done with this shit, so I’m gonna stop here.

And as if all of that wasn’t enough, as John Medina points out in his excellent book “Brain Rules” (I can’t find an excerpt of the section online so you’re just going to have to take my word for it or buy the book), being poor causes constant stress, which is the actual worst for your health. The chemicals released when you’re under persistent stress scar your arteries.

I remember being poor. …Actually, I don’t know if it’s fair to say I was ever poor. I remember the years after I graduated from college and bounced from start-up to freelance gig to shitty part-time job and I was making about $20k/year. I remember being not-well-off. Paychecks were spotty - at one point, my boss literally skipped town and closed the office, taking both my final paycheck and my mouse and laptop cable with him. I was stressed and upset all the time. I worried about money constantly. I was sick a lot. But I always knew, deep down, that if I somehow got into real shit, my parents would give or loan me money. There was never a chance I would end up homeless or completely destitute. I wasn’t poor the way a lot of Americans are poor, where they have no options and no one to turn to. And I was miserable.

So keep all of this in mind the next time you disparage poor people for not working hard enough or for buying ice cream or a Blu-ray player. Unless you’ve been poor - and like I said, I’ve barely scratched the surface of that experience - you don’t get to talk shit on people who are.

(via sepiacircus)

Survey Reveals Shocking Truth About U.S. Poverty

WASHINGTON — Four out of 5 U.S. adults struggle with joblessness, near-poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives, a sign of deteriorating economic security and an elusive American dream.

Survey data exclusive to The Associated Press points to an increasingly globalized U.S. economy, the widening gap between rich and poor, and the loss of good-paying manufacturing jobs as reasons for the trend.

think-progress:

It’s 2013, and only men are on banknotes. 
Here are the women who should go on America’s money.

think-progress:

It’s 2013, and only men are on banknotes.

Here are the women who should go on America’s money.

think-progress:

It’s 2013, and only men are on banknotes. 
Here are the women who should go on America’s money.

think-progress:

It’s 2013, and only men are on banknotes.

Here are the women who should go on America’s money.