A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

itgetsbetterproject:

Share this graphic and take a pledge to always support your loved ones’ gender identity.

itgetsbetterproject:

Share this graphic and take a pledge to always support your loved ones’ gender identity.

(via mysocalled-gay-life)

It Gets Better, Unless You’re Fat

When you first come out, gay men are eager to let you know that you’re not alone, and that you have a seat at the table. Unless, of course, you’re also fat, in which case, no, you can’t sit with us.

It Gets Better, Unless You’re Fat

When you first come out, gay men are eager to let you know that you’re not alone, and that you have a seat at the table. Unless, of course, you’re also fat, in which case, no, you can’t sit with us.

Dan Savage on Bill O'Reilly, Transphobia and Being "Monogamish"

itgetsbetterproject:

We’re very proud to present our first collaboration with the amazing people at the TSER (transstudent.tumblr.com). 
A BIG thank you to Eli, Landyn, Alex and Ethan for this awesome work.
Knowledge is power. Learn more about your rights as a student - visit transstudent.org. You can also get more information from the ACLU’s “Know Your Rights: A Guide for Trans and Gender Nonconforming Students” (http://www.aclu.org/files/assets/transstudent_kyr_20120508.pdf)
Check out the TSER on Facebook (facebook.com/transstudent) and Twitter (twitter.com/transstudent)

itgetsbetterproject:

We’re very proud to present our first collaboration with the amazing people at the TSER (transstudent.tumblr.com). 

A BIG thank you to Eli, Landyn, Alex and Ethan for this awesome work.

Knowledge is power. Learn more about your rights as a student - visit transstudent.org. You can also get more information from the ACLU’s “Know Your Rights: A Guide for Trans and Gender Nonconforming Students” (http://www.aclu.org/files/assets/transstudent_kyr_20120508.pdf)

Check out the TSER on Facebook (facebook.com/transstudent) and Twitter (twitter.com/transstudent)

(via mysocalled-gay-life)

Bullying study suggests ‘it gets better’ as LGBT youth get older

CHICAGO — It really does get better for gay and bisexual teens when it comes to being bullied, although young gay men have it worse than their lesbian peers, according to the first long-term scientific evidence on how the problem changes over time.

“Bullying tends to decline with age regardless of sexual orientation and gender,” and the study confirms that, said co-author Joseph Robinson. “In absolute terms, this would suggest that yes, it gets better.”

Full article here

'That's So Gay' Phrase Has Lasting Impact For LGBT Youth, Study Finds

LGBT students who heard the phrase frequently were more likely to feel isolated and experience headaches, poor appetite or eating problems than those who didn’t. Still, the study also revealed another troubling statistic: a mere 14 respondents (13 percent) hadn’t heard “that’s so gay” at all throughout the duration of the survey.

"Given the nature of gay-lesbian-bisexual stigma, sexual minority students could already perceive themselves to be excluded on campus and hearing ‘that’s so gay’ may elevate such perceptions," Michael Woodford, an assistant professor of social work and co-author of the new study, said in a statement. “‘That’s so gay’ conveys that there is something wrong with being gay."

Keep reading at HuffingtonPost.com

Sharing Three of My Deepest, Darkest Gay Secrets for the First Time to Fight Hate

On Wednesday a tragic incident took place at the offices of the Family Research Council when a man opened fire and wounded a security guard. Details are still emerging about the alleged assailant (who volunteered at the DC Center for the LGBT Community), his state of mind, and his motivation for the heinous act, but one thing is certain: Violence is never justified in response to those who oppose us (and over 25 LGBT organizations and advocacy groups signed a statement stating this and offering their condolences).

However, in the hours that followed the shooting, many on the right have tried to reframe the discussion and looked to place blame for the attack on the Southern Poverty Law Center for designating the FRC as a “hate group.” Bryan Fischer of the American Family Association said in a statement yesterday, “[T]he SPLC, by their own hateful and malicious rhetoric against FRC and AFA, has essentially claimed responsibility for this shooting, and they too should be held to account in the court of public opinion.”

Fischer also claimed that:

SPLC claims it only lists organizations as “hate groups” if they engage in the “propagation of known falsehoods” about homosexuality. But the SPLC website itself lists numerous falsehoods about homosexuality. For instance, the SPLC says, without a single shred of proof, that homosexuals are born that way, that it is impossible to leave the gay lifestyle, and that homosexuals are not at elevated risks of depression, anxiety and substance abuse disorders.

Lying in bed last night, I couldn’t sleep, because my mind kept racing over those three statements and the personal connection I have to each of them. I can’t offer Fischer a “shred of proof” regarding any of the three, but I can tell my stories — stories that very few people outside my close network of friends, and, in some instances, only one or two people, know about — in hopes that other queer people can relate and will tell their deep, dark secrets to help shed light on our lives and humanize our struggles so that people like Fischer and groups like the AFA are, ultimately, unable to continue creating a culture of fear, panic, and hatred.

Keep reading at HuffingtonPost.com

THE QUEER GUIDE TO SURVIVING MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL

I grew up in Cincinnati, OH, which combines Ohio’s love of xenophobia, racism and rivers catching on fire with the vernacular and dental work of Indiana and Kentucky.  Don’t get me wrong.  I’ve got mad love for my hometown and get a little misty-eyed when anyone mentions Skyline or 98 Degrees, but it was also a shitty place to grow up sometimes, especially for a awkward-looking queer kid who was really into Agatha Christie and Drew Barrymore.  I didn’t really have the luxury of hiding my sexuality, because my giant lisp kind of spread the word for me, and I learned a lot from being the only Super Out guy around.  Thus, if you plan on packing your Britney or Tegan and Sara CDs with you to school, this is how to deal.

1.     Immerse Yourself in Your Interests and Study Your Ass Off

When I was 12, I couldn’t really talk to other people at school without it ending in being mocked or having my backpack thrown in the garbage.  I had one real friend—who did the morning announcements—and beanie babies to stand in for the rest of a friend group.  Sometimes, I found fleeting friendships with people, and I made up for a lack of community by finding that in books and movies, learning to inhabit other worlds where I could experience what love was like.  And when I got to high school, I read almost every book our teacher recommended; I was that kid who asked for more homework.

I wasn’t so into math at the time, but I got obsessed with what I was interested in, and it paid off come college application time.  It also helped that I enrolled in almost every school organization I could, which meant that I didn’thaveto have that many friends and could cherish the few real friends I did have.  Who even had the time to be popular?

2.     Work on Your Coping Mechanisms

Keep reading at InOurWordsBlog.com

MPAA CHANGES BULLY RATING TO PG-13, FILM CAN BE SCREENED IN SCHOOLS

Following its initial theatrical release as an unrated feature,Bully has been given a rating of PG-13 from the Motion Picture Association of America, which will allow children under 17 to buy a ticket without parental permission and for the documentary to be screened in schools as an educational tool.

Since the initial announcement that the film would be given an R rating, a number of voices have asked for the film’s importance to be recognized, including organizations, celebrities, and real teens who had experience bullying first hand like out high school student Katy Butler (pictured above with Harvey Weinstein).

At the GLAAD Media Awards in New York on March 24, Harvey Weinstein presented a Special Recognition award to high school student Katy Butler for the petition she began with Change.org to have the film’s rating changed.  GLAAD has worked to spread the film’s important message, including a new PSA series starring Glee’s Naya Rivera and Cory Montieth and Jersey Shore’s Vinny Guadagnino released last week.

The change was made following the removal of several instances of the F-word, but leaving intact a particularly powerful and important scene of teen Alex Libby being bullied and harassed on a bus.  In a press release, distributor The Weinstein Company lauded the MPAA’s decision, calling it a victory “for the parents, educators, lawmakers, and most importantly, children, everywhere who have been fighting for months for the appropriate PG-13 rating without cutting some of the most sensitive moments.”

Read More at GLAAD.org
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(Source: officialedamame, via notpikachu)

(Source: thatanything, via notpikachu)

It happens when a father realizes he doesn’t just love his daughter, but also her wife. It happens when a soldier tells his unit that he’s gay, and they tell him they knew it all along and they didn’t care, because he was the toughest guy in the unit. It happens when a video sparks a movement to let every single young person know they’re not alone, and things will get better. It happens when people look past their ultimately minor differences to see themselves in the hopes and struggles of their fellow human beings. That’s where change is happening.
President Barack Obama (via pinkpanthers)

(Source: debztep, via pinkpanthers)

"We're Glad You're Dead!"

"She [the sister of Jamey Rodemeyer] was having a great time, and all of a sudden a Lady Gaga song came on, and they all started chanting for Jamey, all of his friends," Jamey’s mother, Tracy, told Curry. “Then the bullies that put him into this situation started chanting, ‘You’re better off dead!’ and ‘We’re glad you’re dead!’ and things like that. My daughter came home all upset. It was supposed to be a time for her to grieve and have fun with her friends, and it turned into bullying even after he’s gone."

Fucked up

"Lady Gaga Sings Tribute to Bullying Victim Jamey Rodemeyer"