A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

policymic:

UN report: Global Warming is causing storms, famine and war — and it’s only going to get worse


According to the report, the main cause for concern is CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and fossil fuel consumption. Man-made climate change has already contributed to rising levels and increasingly acidic oceans; if left unchecked, it has the potential to devastate the food supply and lead to further food insecurity and conflict. Wheat and maize production have already been affected by rising temperatures and heat waves.
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

UN report: Global Warming is causing storms, famine and war — and it’s only going to get worse


According to the report, the main cause for concern is CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and fossil fuel consumption. Man-made climate change has already contributed to rising levels and increasingly acidic oceans; if left unchecked, it has the potential to devastate the food supply and lead to further food insecurity and conflict. Wheat and maize production have already been affected by rising temperatures and heat waves.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

UN report: Global Warming is causing storms, famine and war — and it’s only going to get worse

According to the report, the main cause for concern is CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and fossil fuel consumption. Man-made climate change has already contributed to rising levels and increasingly acidic oceans; if left unchecked, it has the potential to devastate the food supply and lead to further food insecurity and conflict. Wheat and maize production have already been affected by rising temperatures and heat waves.

Read moreFollow policymic

No link found between saturated fat and heart disease - Telegraph

fastcompany:

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

fastcompany:

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

Full restaurant menus will now show up in Google search results

Looking for a menu before you go out to eat might have just gotten easier: you can now type “show me the menu for” plus a restaurant name into Google and get the full menu in your search results.

Full restaurant menus will now show up in Google search results

Looking for a menu before you go out to eat might have just gotten easier: you can now type “show me the menu for” plus a restaurant name into Google and get the full menu in your search results.

Much Food Is Lost or Wasted, World Bank Report Says

(Source: emergentfutures, via marbleflakes)

breakingnews:

FDA proposes food label changes
CNN: The Food and Drug Administration is proposing the first changes to food nutrition labels in more than 20 years. 

If approved, the new labels would place a bigger emphasis on total calories, added sugars and certain nutrients, such as Vitamin D and potassium.
The FDA is also proposing changes to serving size requirements in an effort to more accurately reflect what people usually eat or drink. For example, if you buy a 20-ounce soda, you’re probably not going to stop drinking at the 8-ounce mark. The new rules would require that entire soda bottle to be one serving size — making calorie counting simpler.

Follow the latest on Breaking News.
Photo: The new label, right, would emphasize calories and added sugars. (FDA)

breakingnews:

FDA proposes food label changes

CNNThe Food and Drug Administration is proposing the first changes to food nutrition labels in more than 20 years. 

If approved, the new labels would place a bigger emphasis on total calories, added sugars and certain nutrients, such as Vitamin D and potassium.

The FDA is also proposing changes to serving size requirements in an effort to more accurately reflect what people usually eat or drink. For example, if you buy a 20-ounce soda, you’re probably not going to stop drinking at the 8-ounce mark. The new rules would require that entire soda bottle to be one serving size — making calorie counting simpler.

Follow the latest on Breaking News.

Photo: The new label, right, would emphasize calories and added sugars. (FDA)

yeevil:

pizzaforpresident:

McDonalds Canada debunks the ‘pink goo’ myth and shows how McNuggets are actually made. 

THIS IS HOW YOU DO TRANSPARENCY. EVERY MAJOR FOOD DISTRIBUTOR SHOULD HAVE ONE OF THESE FOR LITERALLY EVERY SINGLE FOOD ITEM THEY MAKE.

(via tyleroakley)

iammissanna:

dduane:

small-potato-of-defiance:

dduane:

fallen-angel-of-thursday:

useyourcharm:

SO I CAN LIVE OFF MASHED POTATOES
IS THAT WHAT YOU’RE SAYING

this was a large study spanning many years and is sometimes known as ireland

(sigh) Please tell me that somebody has rebutted this drivel.

Well, actually, one could survive on nothing but raw milk. But it has to be raw, because pasteurisation destroys nutrients such as Vitamins B-12, B-6, C, A, beneficial bacteria, as well as denatures delicate milk proteins and vital enzymes and homogenization causes a release of an enzyme, Xanthine Oxidase, which is harmful once artificially broken down into a smaller state.
Raw milk, however, is a perfect food. In the 1920’s, doctors at the Mayo clinic prescribed a month of nothing-but-raw-milk to cure tuberculosis.

Uh. Please forgive me: I must now put on my Nurse Hat. (because yeah, we did diet science as well.)
First of all: You have to define “survive”. Could you live on raw milk (which I love, by the way, I was a happy customer of Alta-Dena Dairy in LA, which did the best raw milk and r-m cheese and butter…) for short periods, say a week or so? Yeah. Would you then start feeling like crap in fairly short order? Yeah. Because various parts of your digestive system need bulk to work with, ideally fiber (though meat/fowl/fish/other solid foods will be acceptable too)… and milk will not provide that. And as the adult human gut is really not designed to work on digested curd alone, you will shortly be the most constipated person in your neighborhood. And then the real trouble will begin. If someone trying this stunt is even slightly lactose-intolerant to begin with, an all-milk diet is a good way to exacerbate the condition into a full blown intolerance crisis. There’s also the issue of what would start happening to one’s insulin levels, cholesterol levels, how the liver and gall bladder are likely to react (i.e., badly)…  In short: if somebody tries to subsist on raw milk alone for any significant period, they will be very sorry. So will the people who eventually have to deal with them in the ER / A&E.
And as for raw milk being a perfect food… Sorry: no. It lacks vital amino acids, is desperately poor in numerous vitamins and trace elements (especially iron) that your body requires for continued proper functioning, and is generally unsatisfactory as the single major constituent of anybody's diet over the age of, oh, twelve to fifteen months. (Not that I would be entirely happy giving raw cow's milk to babies, but that's a whole separate area of dietetics.)
I would be interested (in purely ironic mode) to see a solid citation of the Mayo Clinic allegation. Because if they ever did prescribe a nothing-but-raw-milk diet, then (a) they really should have known better (but then again look at the so-called Sippy Diet for ulcers, about as effective against the actual cause of gastric ulcers as trying to cap a fire hose with a Kleenex: it took brave researchers to show us the real cause and cure) and (b) we all see how well that worked in eradicating TB worldwide! — Because if such a cure had been proven effective at a time when TB was ravaging the western world, it would have become famous within weeks and would have wiped the disease out in all but a few inaccessible hot spots in a matter of years. (Seriously, don’t get me started on TB. The nursing school where I trained had gigantic buildings that until the introduction of antituberculars like INH had been crammed full of tens of thousands of fellow New Yorkers essentially confined in isolation like lepers, waiting to die. And now here it comes again, partnered with HIV and worse than before. It makes me want to spit.)
Again, I like raw milk. I drink it by preference when I can get it, and am a supporter of the drive to keep it from being made illegal in Ireland. (In the land of the banbhianna, the "white meats", among descendants of the ancient people to whom cows were money and who loved their dairy products more than almost anything else, such an occurrence would be incredibly ironic.) But the adult human body is omnivorous (just look at the teeth) and is not built to live on milk alone. Trying to make it do in the long term will have the same kind of effect as is suffered by the unfortunate cats and dogs of the tragically confused vegans who try to wean their carnivore pets off meat.
(sigh) And adding potatoes only helps a little. That requires a more detailed rebuttal. A project for another day when I’m not thinking mostly about wizards and seedcake.



Hey Hog, correct me if I’m wrong, but aren’t the particular variety of potato that were so nutritionally awesome and were the main staple food back in the day now completely extinct? And modern potatoes don’t have all that nutrition people used to live on?
It reminds me of how when Europeans invaded the Americas and found people living there eating all this maize and being totally healthy and happy, they thought it was this awesome superfood and tried to bring it back to Europe to live off of, and then everyone died of malnutrition, because they forgot to also bring over the critical process of nixtamalization, which is what actually imbued the maize with all that nutrition.
Plus don’t forget that even if a food meets the minimum on a lot of things, it might also exceed the maximum on other things. And one of the big reasons a high-starch diet wouldn’t cause medical problems for the people who were eating it was also because they were working their butts off all day every day. A person who is living a less active life would respond to a diet like that very differently.

iammissanna:

dduane:

small-potato-of-defiance:

dduane:

fallen-angel-of-thursday:

useyourcharm:

SO I CAN LIVE OFF MASHED POTATOES

IS THAT WHAT YOU’RE SAYING

this was a large study spanning many years and is sometimes known as ireland

(sigh) Please tell me that somebody has rebutted this drivel.

Well, actually, one could survive on nothing but raw milk. But it has to be raw, because pasteurisation destroys nutrients such as Vitamins B-12, B-6, C, A, beneficial bacteria, as well as denatures delicate milk proteins and vital enzymes and homogenization causes a release of an enzyme, Xanthine Oxidase, which is harmful once artificially broken down into a smaller state.

Raw milk, however, is a perfect food. In the 1920’s, doctors at the Mayo clinic prescribed a month of nothing-but-raw-milk to cure tuberculosis.

Uh. Please forgive me: I must now put on my Nurse Hat. (because yeah, we did diet science as well.)

First of all: You have to define “survive”. Could you live on raw milk (which I love, by the way, I was a happy customer of Alta-Dena Dairy in LA, which did the best raw milk and r-m cheese and butter…) for short periods, say a week or so? Yeah. Would you then start feeling like crap in fairly short order? Yeah. Because various parts of your digestive system need bulk to work with, ideally fiber (though meat/fowl/fish/other solid foods will be acceptable too)… and milk will not provide that. And as the adult human gut is really not designed to work on digested curd alone, you will shortly be the most constipated person in your neighborhood. And then the real trouble will begin. If someone trying this stunt is even slightly lactose-intolerant to begin with, an all-milk diet is a good way to exacerbate the condition into a full blown intolerance crisis. There’s also the issue of what would start happening to one’s insulin levels, cholesterol levels, how the liver and gall bladder are likely to react (i.e., badly)…  In short: if somebody tries to subsist on raw milk alone for any significant period, they will be very sorry. So will the people who eventually have to deal with them in the ER / A&E.

And as for raw milk being a perfect food… Sorry: no. It lacks vital amino acids, is desperately poor in numerous vitamins and trace elements (especially iron) that your body requires for continued proper functioning, and is generally unsatisfactory as the single major constituent of anybody's diet over the age of, oh, twelve to fifteen months. (Not that I would be entirely happy giving raw cow's milk to babies, but that's a whole separate area of dietetics.)

I would be interested (in purely ironic mode) to see a solid citation of the Mayo Clinic allegation. Because if they ever did prescribe a nothing-but-raw-milk diet, then (a) they really should have known better (but then again look at the so-called Sippy Diet for ulcers, about as effective against the actual cause of gastric ulcers as trying to cap a fire hose with a Kleenex: it took brave researchers to show us the real cause and cure) and (b) we all see how well that worked in eradicating TB worldwide! — Because if such a cure had been proven effective at a time when TB was ravaging the western world, it would have become famous within weeks and would have wiped the disease out in all but a few inaccessible hot spots in a matter of years. (Seriously, don’t get me started on TB. The nursing school where I trained had gigantic buildings that until the introduction of antituberculars like INH had been crammed full of tens of thousands of fellow New Yorkers essentially confined in isolation like lepers, waiting to die. And now here it comes again, partnered with HIV and worse than before. It makes me want to spit.)

Again, I like raw milk. I drink it by preference when I can get it, and am a supporter of the drive to keep it from being made illegal in Ireland. (In the land of the banbhianna, the "white meats", among descendants of the ancient people to whom cows were money and who loved their dairy products more than almost anything else, such an occurrence would be incredibly ironic.) But the adult human body is omnivorous (just look at the teeth) and is not built to live on milk alone. Trying to make it do in the long term will have the same kind of effect as is suffered by the unfortunate cats and dogs of the tragically confused vegans who try to wean their carnivore pets off meat.

(sigh) And adding potatoes only helps a little. That requires a more detailed rebuttal. A project for another day when I’m not thinking mostly about wizards and seedcake.

Hey Hog, correct me if I’m wrong, but aren’t the particular variety of potato that were so nutritionally awesome and were the main staple food back in the day now completely extinct? And modern potatoes don’t have all that nutrition people used to live on?

It reminds me of how when Europeans invaded the Americas and found people living there eating all this maize and being totally healthy and happy, they thought it was this awesome superfood and tried to bring it back to Europe to live off of, and then everyone died of malnutrition, because they forgot to also bring over the critical process of nixtamalization, which is what actually imbued the maize with all that nutrition.

Plus don’t forget that even if a food meets the minimum on a lot of things, it might also exceed the maximum on other things. And one of the big reasons a high-starch diet wouldn’t cause medical problems for the people who were eating it was also because they were working their butts off all day every day. A person who is living a less active life would respond to a diet like that very differently.

(via sepiacircus)

theatlantic:

The Rise and Fall of Orange Juice As a Health Drink

A tall glass of orange juice is the very image of refreshment, packed with vitamins and radiating with sunshine freshness. It’s part of a balanced breakfast, after all. But America’s classic morning drink is in trouble: sales of commercial orange juice are down to their lowest levels in the last 15 seasons, according to the WSJ and the Florida Department of Citrus. The industry is facing growing competition from exotic fruit and energy drinks while its “all-natural” claims are being called into serious question.
Orange juice’s fresh and healthy reputation lies in the balance today, but it was once America’s healing elixir around which an entire industry staked its hopes. Orange juice’s fabled health benefits were promoted by nutritionists, fruit producers, marketers, and the government, who credited orange juice with curing everything from scurvy to listlessness, and even a rare blood condition called Acidosis. But orange juice did not always have a place at the American breakfast table, mostly because for years it was either too expensive, or just didn’t taste very good.
Read more. [Image: Daniel Wehner/Flickr]

theatlantic:

The Rise and Fall of Orange Juice As a Health Drink

A tall glass of orange juice is the very image of refreshment, packed with vitamins and radiating with sunshine freshness. It’s part of a balanced breakfast, after all. But America’s classic morning drink is in trouble: sales of commercial orange juice are down to their lowest levels in the last 15 seasons, according to the WSJ and the Florida Department of Citrus. The industry is facing growing competition from exotic fruit and energy drinks while its “all-natural” claims are being called into serious question.

Orange juice’s fresh and healthy reputation lies in the balance today, but it was once America’s healing elixir around which an entire industry staked its hopes. Orange juice’s fabled health benefits were promoted by nutritionists, fruit producers, marketers, and the government, who credited orange juice with curing everything from scurvy to listlessness, and even a rare blood condition called Acidosis. But orange juice did not always have a place at the American breakfast table, mostly because for years it was either too expensive, or just didn’t taste very good.

Read more. [Image: Daniel Wehner/Flickr]

According to a study from the University of Washington, the rift between healthy grub and junk food is wider than it’s ever been. Researchers were able to buy 2,000 calories of junk food for $3.52 — that’s an entire day’s caloric intake — where nutritious foods cost them a whopping $36 for the same 2,000 calories.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Food In The USA (via trashysnacks)

So, you know, STFU forever about “it’s cheaper to eat healthy LOL poor people don’t get how money works!”

(via thebicker)

(Source: maximilianyearsbc, via sepiacircus)

mothernaturenetwork:

Not sure which foods will give your daily allotment of certain vitamins? Here’s a handy cheat sheet.

mothernaturenetwork:

Not sure which foods will give your daily allotment of certain vitamins? Here’s a handy cheat sheet.

Why Sugar Makes Us Feel So Good

(Source: NPR)