A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 24, 1989: Exxon Valdez Runs Aground, Causing Major Oil Spill
The distress call came just after midnight, March 24, 1989. Captain Joseph Hazelwood radioed the Port of Valdez the tanker under his command, and named for the town it had just left, had run aground.The vessel was loaded with 53 million gallons of crude oil when it struck the reef. Nearly 11 million gallons leaked from the ship.The spill spread quickly and devastated the waters and coastline of the surrounding area. Hundreds of thousands of seabirds, thousands of marine mammals, and countless fish were killed by the viscous oil that would eventually coat nearly 10,000 square miles of the sound and 1,200 miles of shoreline.In 2008, almost twenty years since the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Supreme Court decided to reduce victims’ compensation in Alaska. Head on over to the PBS NewsHour to see how the impact of the accident still lingers in the region.
Photo: The Exxon Valdez three days after the vessel grounded, just before a storm arrived (Office of Response and Restoration, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 24, 1989: Exxon Valdez Runs Aground, Causing Major Oil Spill

The distress call came just after midnight, March 24, 1989. Captain Joseph Hazelwood radioed the Port of Valdez the tanker under his command, and named for the town it had just left, had run aground.

The vessel was loaded with 53 million gallons of crude oil when it struck the reef. Nearly 11 million gallons leaked from the ship.

The spill spread quickly and devastated the waters and coastline of the surrounding area. Hundreds of thousands of seabirds, thousands of marine mammals, and countless fish were killed by the viscous oil that would eventually coat nearly 10,000 square miles of the sound and 1,200 miles of shoreline.

In 2008, almost twenty years since the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Supreme Court decided to reduce victims’ compensation in Alaska. Head on over to the PBS NewsHour to see how the impact of the accident still lingers in the region.

Photo: The Exxon Valdez three days after the vessel grounded, just before a storm arrived (Office of Response and Restoration, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org, via marbleflakes)

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art: 
"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 
The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.
(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art:

"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 

The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.

(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

Economic growth is the biggest destroyer of the ecology. Those people who think you can have a growing economy and a healthy environment are wrong. If we don’t reduce our numbers, nature will do it for us … Everything is worse and we’re still doing the same things. Because ecosystems are so resilient, they don’t exact immediate punishment on the stupid.

SF becomes first major city to ban sale of plastic water bottles

mothernaturenetwork:

Composting park proposal keeps NYC’s organic waste close to homeTalk about pulling double-duty: In lieu of being hauled out of state, will organic waste be turned into compost at a network of park-topped artificial islands dotting NYC’s waterfront?

mothernaturenetwork:

Composting park proposal keeps NYC’s organic waste close to home
Talk about pulling double-duty: In lieu of being hauled out of state, will organic waste be turned into compost at a network of park-topped artificial islands dotting NYC’s waterfront?


The futuristic-looking cab is at least 20 percent more aerodynamic than the current vehicles in Walmart’s fleet, and features a center-mounted driver’s seat wrapped in large windows as well as LCD displays providing views around the truck.

The futuristic-looking cab is at least 20 percent more aerodynamic than the current vehicles in Walmart’s fleet, and features a center-mounted driver’s seat wrapped in large windows as well as LCD displays providing views around the truck.

mothernaturenetwork:

Want to climb Mount Everest? Bring extra trash bagsStarting in April, anyone who climbs Mount Everest in Nepal will be legally required to collect not just their own garbage, but also at least 17.6 pounds of trash left on the mountain by previous climbers.

mothernaturenetwork:

Want to climb Mount Everest? Bring extra trash bags
Starting in April, anyone who climbs Mount Everest in Nepal will be legally required to collect not just their own garbage, but also at least 17.6 pounds of trash left on the mountain by previous climbers.

This all happened within two weeks.

This all happened within two weeks.


Take 300,000 computer-controlled mirrors, each 7 feet high and 10 feet wide. Control them with computers to focus the Sun’s light to the top of 459-foot towers, where water is turned into steam to power turbines. Bingo: you have the world’s biggest solar power plant, the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System.

Take 300,000 computer-controlled mirrors, each 7 feet high and 10 feet wide. Control them with computers to focus the Sun’s light to the top of 459-foot towers, where water is turned into steam to power turbines. Bingo: you have the world’s biggest solar power plant, the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System.