A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

What's Behind the Backlash to Houston's 'One Bin for All' Program

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Today, the Obama administration announced its plan to slash carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants 30% by 2030. This chart from The Climate Desk shows which states will likely be most affected by the new policy. Learn more.

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Today, the Obama administration announced its plan to slash carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants 30% by 2030. 

This chart from The Climate Desk shows which states will likely be most affected by the new policy. Learn more.

As Summer Officially Begins, A 1,250-Pound Tar Mat Discovered Off Florida Beach

Yu-Chang Chou designs Repack packaging for returning online shopping

Conservatives Are Purposely Making Their Cars Spew Black Smoke To Protest Obama And Environmentalists

mothernaturenetwork:

Plastic garbage in the ocean is mysteriously disappearingScientists theorize that the plastic is being broken down into tiny, undetectable particles or that it is being carried into the deep ocean.

mothernaturenetwork:

Plastic garbage in the ocean is mysteriously disappearing
Scientists theorize that the plastic is being broken down into tiny, undetectable particles or that it is being carried into the deep ocean.

micdotcom:

A 19-year-old has just designed a machine that could save our oceans 

Boyan Slat, a 19-year-old from the Netherlands, designed a floating structure that could mop up 70,000 metric tons of plastic — the weight of more than 300 Statues of Liberty — from the northern Pacific Ocean. Talk about being a boy genius. 
Read more | Follow micdotcom
micdotcom:

A 19-year-old has just designed a machine that could save our oceans 

Boyan Slat, a 19-year-old from the Netherlands, designed a floating structure that could mop up 70,000 metric tons of plastic — the weight of more than 300 Statues of Liberty — from the northern Pacific Ocean. Talk about being a boy genius. 
Read more | Follow micdotcom
micdotcom:

A 19-year-old has just designed a machine that could save our oceans 

Boyan Slat, a 19-year-old from the Netherlands, designed a floating structure that could mop up 70,000 metric tons of plastic — the weight of more than 300 Statues of Liberty — from the northern Pacific Ocean. Talk about being a boy genius. 
Read more | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

A 19-year-old has just designed a machine that could save our oceans 

Boyan Slat, a 19-year-old from the Netherlands, designed a floating structure that could mop up 70,000 metric tons of plastic — the weight of more than 300 Statues of Liberty — from the northern Pacific Ocean. Talk about being a boy genius. 

Read more | Follow micdotcom

SCOTUS rules for limits on EPA global warming rules

breakingnews:

APThe Supreme Court ruled Monday that the EPA lacks the authority in some cases to force companies to evaluate ways to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. 

Find out first with the Breaking News app.

fastcompany:

Tiny “microbeads” in beauty products seemed great, until someone tried to clean them up.
Sometimes product innovation turns out beautifully. Other times, it gets messy and requires a clean up. The story of plastic microbeads in personal care products—the tiny spheres in many body washes and toothpastes that Illinois became the first state to ban last week—is an example of the latter.


Read More>

fastcompany:

Tiny “microbeads” in beauty products seemed great, until someone tried to clean them up.

Sometimes product innovation turns out beautifully. Other times, it gets messy and requires a clean up. The story of plastic microbeads in personal care products—the tiny spheres in many body washes and toothpastes that Illinois became the first state to ban last week—is an example of the latter.

image

Read More>

Ocean Confetti—How plastic affects our oceans

fastcompany:

Knocking down a concrete building usually takes brute force: Wrecking balls, huge excavators, or explosives rip apart walls while fire hoses spray water to keep the clouds of dust down. It’s an energy-intensive process, and after everything’s been torn apart, the concrete often ends up in a landfill or has to be trucked to a recycling facility. But a new concrete-erasing robot may eventually transform the messy business of demolition.
Read More> 

fastcompany:

Knocking down a concrete building usually takes brute force: Wrecking balls, huge excavators, or explosives rip apart walls while fire hoses spray water to keep the clouds of dust down. It’s an energy-intensive process, and after everything’s been torn apart, the concrete often ends up in a landfill or has to be trucked to a recycling facility. But a new concrete-erasing robot may eventually transform the messy business of demolition.

Read More> 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 24, 1989: Exxon Valdez Runs Aground, Causing Major Oil Spill
The distress call came just after midnight, March 24, 1989. Captain Joseph Hazelwood radioed the Port of Valdez the tanker under his command, and named for the town it had just left, had run aground.The vessel was loaded with 53 million gallons of crude oil when it struck the reef. Nearly 11 million gallons leaked from the ship.The spill spread quickly and devastated the waters and coastline of the surrounding area. Hundreds of thousands of seabirds, thousands of marine mammals, and countless fish were killed by the viscous oil that would eventually coat nearly 10,000 square miles of the sound and 1,200 miles of shoreline.In 2008, almost twenty years since the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Supreme Court decided to reduce victims’ compensation in Alaska. Head on over to the PBS NewsHour to see how the impact of the accident still lingers in the region.
Photo: The Exxon Valdez three days after the vessel grounded, just before a storm arrived (Office of Response and Restoration, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

pbsthisdayinhistory:

March 24, 1989: Exxon Valdez Runs Aground, Causing Major Oil Spill

The distress call came just after midnight, March 24, 1989. Captain Joseph Hazelwood radioed the Port of Valdez the tanker under his command, and named for the town it had just left, had run aground.

The vessel was loaded with 53 million gallons of crude oil when it struck the reef. Nearly 11 million gallons leaked from the ship.

The spill spread quickly and devastated the waters and coastline of the surrounding area. Hundreds of thousands of seabirds, thousands of marine mammals, and countless fish were killed by the viscous oil that would eventually coat nearly 10,000 square miles of the sound and 1,200 miles of shoreline.

In 2008, almost twenty years since the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Supreme Court decided to reduce victims’ compensation in Alaska. Head on over to the PBS NewsHour to see how the impact of the accident still lingers in the region.

Photo: The Exxon Valdez three days after the vessel grounded, just before a storm arrived (Office of Response and Restoration, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org, via marbleflakes)

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art: 
"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 
The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.
(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)

unconsumption:

Plastic debris washed up on beaches gets turned into beachfront art:

"Plastic World" — made by Portuguese artists Carole Purnelle and Nuno Maya — pictured in Australia, on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk, during the 2013 Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi exhibition. 

The spherical sculpture is 79” (200 cm) in diameter, in case you’re wondering.

(photo credit: Halans on Flickr)