A Curious Eye

A Curious Eye

My name's Ben. I'm a 22 year-old recent grad living in Seattle. I've been told my gayness is only matched by my enthusiasm.
I post my favorite news from all around the web.
Topics you'll see:
Queer - Liberalism - Activism - Student Issues- Public Transportation - Peace - Environmentalism - Politics - Law - Atheism - Vegetarianism - Feminism - Sex Positivity - Philosophy.

nbcnews:

Coke features first gay family to appear in a Super Bowl ad
(Photo: Coca-Cola)
In the second quarter of the Super Bowl, Coke became the first advertiser to show a gay family in an ad for America’s big game.
Continue reading

nbcnews:

Coke features first gay family to appear in a Super Bowl ad

(Photo: Coca-Cola)

In the second quarter of the Super Bowl, Coke became the first advertiser to show a gay family in an ad for America’s big game.

Continue reading

(Source: NBCNews.com, via mysocalled-gay-life)

Coca-Cola’s “America the Beautiful” Super Bowl Commercial Sparks Outrage on Twitter

Coca-Cola’s “America the Beautiful” Super Bowl Commercial Sparks Outrage on Twitter

Watch This Soda Exec Get Grilled About Coke's Sugar Content

Behind Coke's Attempt to Unite Indians and Pakistanis with Vending Machines

Could Soda Finally Be Fizzing Out?

New York Plans to Ban Sale of Big Sizes of Sugary Drinks

New York City plans to enact a far-reaching ban on the sale of large sodas and other sugary drinks at restaurants, movie theaters and street carts, in the most ambitious effort yet by the Bloomberg administration to combat rising obesity.

The proposed ban would affect virtually the entire menu of popular sugary drinks found in delis, fast-food franchises and even sports arenas, from energy drinks to pre-sweetened iced teas. The sale of any cup or bottle of sweetened drink larger than 16 fluid ounces — about the size of a medium coffee, and smaller than a common soda bottle — would be prohibited under the first-in-the-nation plan, which could take effect as soon as next March.

The measure would not apply to diet sodas, fruit juices, dairy-based drinks like milkshakes, or alcoholic beverages; it would not extend to beverages sold in grocery stores or convenience stores.

“Obesity is a nationwide problem, and all over the United States, public health officials are wringing their hands saying, ‘Oh, this is terrible,’ ” Mr. Bloomberg said in an interview on Wednesday in City Hall’s sprawling Governor’s Room.

Keep reading at NYTimes.com

"What's So Great About Ikea, Anyway? Why No One in the World Likes Brands"

What if 70 percent of brands in the world disappeared overnight? Most people wouldn’t care, according to a new study of 50,000 people in 14 global markets performed by Havas Media, an international communications firm.

Of all the brands surveyed, only 20 percent made a notably positive impact on people’s lives. That means for all the millions spent on marketing and ads around the world, most people could care less which company sells them their lunch, television, or car. “The overall consumption model and the overall marketing model is not working anymore,” says Sara del Dios, the Havas executive behind the survey.

Reflecting demonstrations and disappointment in the global economy, the survey notes that most consumers don’t trust companies, think their efforts to be responsible are largely spin, and that they don’t work hard to fix big problems.”